This week’s episode of Destination Linux, we are going to discuss what made us Linux Enthusiasts! Then we’re going to discuss some good news with Firefox’s latest release . . . it seems that the have been listening to DL. Plus we’ve also got our famous tips, tricks and software picks. All of this and so much more this week on Destination Linux. So whether you’re brand new to Linux and open source or a guru of sudo. This is the podcast for you.

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Ryan (DasGeek) = dasgeekcommunity.com
Michael Tunnell = tuxdigital.com
Jill Bryant = jilllinuxgirl.com
Noah Chelliah = asknoahshow.com

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Segment Index

Comments

  1. My Life with Linux/Ubuntu

    1. My first contact with Linux was around 2003/04. My son bought a PC and that came with Linux installed. He asked for my help, so I soon realized it was a CLI and not MSDOS, so I installed Window XP Home for him. That was better suited for him and my grandchildren.
    2. In 2005 I bought a PC Magazine and it had a CD with Ubuntu 5.04. At that time I had a spare Pentium II with two 2GB SCSI disks. One disk was too small for Ubuntu, so I had to use LVM or its predecessor to get it installed. It all worked and I was impressed. But I lost that PC and that ended my first Ubuntu adventure.
    3. In 2008 I bought a new laptop a 2-core Athlon on 1.8GHz and a slow 160GB HDD (40MB/s). It came with Windows Vista, but that was very very slow. I remembered Ubuntu and started dual booting Vista and Ubuntu 8.04. To do right to Vista, after a new 320GB HDD (80MB/s) and 2 service packs, Vista became quite usable.
    4. I retired 1-1-11 and moved completely to Ubuntu 10.04 and I moved Windows XP to a Virtualbox Virtual Machine and that did run on an off-lease Pentium 4 HT (3.0GHz); 2GB DDR (400MHz) and a typical 250GB IDE HDD. I started to distro hop with VMs, I remember 4x OpenSUSE, Xubuntu and Lubuntu.
    5. I still run my first love Ubuntu, now version 21.10 with OpenZFS and over time I collected ~70 VMs, so I have all Windows versions from 1.04 (1985) to 11 (2021) and all Ubuntu LTS versions, the first Ubuntu 4.10. my first one 5.04, 21.10 on the bare metal and 5 versions of the future 22.04 in a VM. Of course I also still have OpenSUSE, Xubuntu and Lubuntu from 2012. I tried a lot of other distros and thus I have VMs with Fedora; Manjaro; Garuda Linux; Zorin etc etc.

    I moved all my “work” to VMs and now my main VMs are:

    • Xubuntu 20.04 LTS for all communication apps, the only VM with open ports;
    • Ubuntu 16.04 ESM with Unity encrypted by Virtualbox and exclusively used for banking and PayPal with the newest Firefox and LibreOffice snaps. I intend to use it till 2026.
    • Ubuntu Studio 20.04 LTS for the multimedia stuff. However for playing the wma copies of my old CDs and LPs, I often use Windows XP with WoW and TrueBass effects.
    • Ubuntu 20.04 LTS for trying out apps and for other experiments.
    • Windows 10 Pro.

    To prepare for the future I run the next stuff in VMs, note that two VMs run with nested virtualization:

    • Ubuntu 22.04 on OpenZFS with Virtualbox to test my new Host.
    • Ubuntu Mate 22.04 with QEMU/KVM to compare both virtualization solutions, on functionality and ease of use.
    • Xubuntu 22.04 to test its use for the communication apps, half of the time I use 22.04 instead of 20.04 for the real work.
    • Ubuntu Studio 22.04 to look whether I’m prepared to move to KDE instead of XFCE. I might stay with 20.04 and XFCE.
    • Ubuntu Budgie 22.04
    • Windows 11 Pro, to check out the effect of current HW limitations in a VM.
  2. Avatar for Johnny Johnny says:

    I first really got into Linux when I got a Raspberry Pi for my 11th birthday. I was immediately intrigued because it all was so new and exciting compared to Windows. Without really doing much of any research I just explored Linux (Raspbian + Ubuntu MATE) on my Pi, and I loved how hackable, modular and customizable it was compared to Windows (just a few months after my 11th birthday Windows 10 came out and it was the exact opposite). And discovering Linux on the Pi also taught me a lot about computers in general.

    About a year later I got an old Laptop with no OS on which I installed Xubuntu, and I used that a LOT for just about everything. I also learned about Wine and that Steam was available for Linux, so at that point I was determined that when I’d build my new gaming PC I would put Linux on it and possibly even daily drive it if most of my games ran on it.

    Well, I ended up installing Windows on it anyways because many of my games didn’t work on Linux at the time, but soon I installed a second SSD and put Linux Mint on it, which I played around with every once in a while. Once DXVK, Lutris and Proton where starting to come together (late 2018) I decided to do a “One week of Linux only” challenge. Since I was already used to using all the open source apps that are available to Linux and nearly all my games now worked, that “week” has never ended. I don’t even have my Windows SSD anymore. Since then I have dived much deeper into Linux and it still excites me to this day.

    Oh, and now I run Arch with KDE Plasma by the way :wink:

  3. When my Skyrim characters become powerful and rich, I get bored and start again with a new character. I build a desk and it works, but if I rebuild it my life will be better (surely?). If I buy a screen / amplifier / keyboard / … there is a better one sitting ready to buy, only a “want click have” away. I am never satisfied. And I end up with a heap of hardware, bits of wood and I run out of save space in steam.

    With Linux when I apply this same pattern it is called distro hopping. The only cost is time and I can always go back if it doesn’t work out. I love being able to do what I do best and that is changing my mind. I am an expert in changing my mind.

  4. Are you harboring an borderline unhealthy obsession running SUSE by chance?!? or in some other way related to @CubicleNate ?

  5. Simply enjoyed Jill’s joviality and the general enthusiasm of you guys.

    Thanks! :slight_smile:

    A distro hopper who, for some reason, always goes back to MX KDE.
    An easy way out for a permanent, Linux newbie i guess.

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