This week’s episode of Destination Linux, we’re going to talk about our favorite distros so far in 2021, so for all the distro-hoppers out there, you dont want to miss this one. Then we take a look at Google’s FLoC tracking concept, which is claimed to bring targeted ads into a privacy-preserving future. We’ll discuss why a lot of people don’t seem to be FLoCing towards this idea. Plus we’ve also got our famous tips, tricks and software picks. All of this and so much more this week on Destination Linux. So whether you’re brand new to Linux and open source or a guru of sudo. This is the podcast for you.

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Hosts of Destination Linux:

Ryan (DasGeek) = dasgeekcommunity.com
Michael Tunnell = tuxdigital.com
Jill Bryant = twitter.com/jill_linuxgirl

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Segment Index

Comments

  1. So I agree with Ryan this week pretty much across the board. I’m pretty comfy in any mainstream distribution these days.

    My 2021 (first half) distribution picks: Fedora 34 and openSUSE Tumbleweed.

    Fedora 34 is very, very nice and it would probably be my go-to for newbs but it’s hard not to recommend Ubuntu LTS because that’s what proprietary software seems to be targeting. Fedora is definitely my go-to for intermediate Windows users.

    openSUSE Tumbleweed is like Fedora’s scruffy nerdy cousin. They don’t care about aesthetics, they might not go out to the cool parties, but they have their own power tools and they keep things current without making things unstable.

    That said, I think distro hopping is more a battle of defaults with the hoppers endlessly searching to find “perfect” defaults. As users get more used to Linux, the need for perfect defaults becomes diminished.

  2. I frikkin’ love vertical boxes! Is it hard to keep 3 people in frame that long without use of coordinated multiple-axis inertial chairs or powerful lasers? Yes. BUT daaamn does it look cool.

    I don’t think they should have rounded corners (imho) and they look best when they’re tall. Check out the day of legend when these video skyscrapers first hit the scene!

    That’s a good point on distro outreach. One of the major reasons I started taking Fedora seriously which lead to me moving was the Fedora and Red Hat members in the community. All my guides now include Fedora and often CentOS instructions so that’s one example of the positive downstream effects.


    Firefox eyedropper (as mentioned in the show)

    Method 1.
    Hamburger Menu → Web Developer → Eyedropper

    Method 2.
    F12 → Inspector tab (if not pre-selected) → Click eyedropper icon

    As for a native shortcut key or ability to set one for one/both of the eyedropper modes, a ticket was opened 6yrs ago with some discussion.

  3. I still have to listen to the show but I think this year I have already found my personal favorite and it is EndeavourOS. It still runs on one of my Thinkpads with LXQT. I would have never thought I would use LXQT for so long. But I think vanilla LXQT was more to my liking then anything I saw that was already heavily customized.

  4. Thanks, everyone for all the info and laughs! My favourite joke of the week: rename to Ewwwgle :laughing:

    Seriously though, I do agree Fedora’s been awesome with BTRFS, and Pipewire implementations. So much innovation this year. As far as hopping goes, I almost never do it myself. I think I’ve been a regular user of Debian since approximately 2014, so about seven years without change.

    I’ve heard about Firefox containers a number of times but this week am making a resolution to actually try them as @MichaelTunnell also kindly explained they do a lot more than just “new private window” which I often use.

  5. So I just want to share the luv for Firefox and it’s useful tools for the user and developer.

    As we all know about:config lets you access all kinds of cool settings for Firefox but did you know that there are other cool about: commands you can also use?

    These can all be accessed via about:about

    Some of the coolest ones are about:performance , about:memory , about:networking and about:protections

    Really, I don’t think any other browser enables such power to the user out of the box, and so it will take something really special to make me abandon Firefox.

    OK well I just wanted to mention that in case people don’t realise how cool Firefox is. It is about time you woke up and learned.

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