Coming up on this week’s episode of Destination Linux, we have an interview with Dan Johansen of Manjaro ARM to talk all things ARM. The big topic of the week is about Bug Reports and how they can get better for both Users and Developers so Let’s Squash Some Bugs. In the News, we talk about the new AMD Ryzen Linux Laptops are finally hitting the market. Thanks to Tuxedo & Slimbook we’ve got 2 new Linux Laptops with the Tuxedo Pulse 15 & the KDE Slimbook. In Linux Gaming section we talk about SuperTuxKart which an awesome Open Source game for Linux! We’ve also got some great Community Feedback to talk about. In addition to our Software Spotlight we are going to start explaining the Linux Filesystem in the Tip of the Week for a Filesystem Breakdown Series. All of this and so much more on Episode 184 of the #1 video-centric Linux podcast, Destination Linux!

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Hosts of Destination Linux 184:

Michael of TuxDigital = https://tuxdigital.com
Ryan, aka DasGeek = https://dasgeekcommunity.com
Noah of Ask Noah Show = https://asknoahshow.com

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Segment Index

  • 00:00:00 Intro
  • 00:00:49 Welcome to DL184
  • 00:01:45 What Noah has been up to
  • 00:03:47 What Ryan has been up to
  • 00:05:06 What Michael has been up to
  • 00:07:08 Community Feedback: Rolling Release vs LTS or are there other options?
  • 00:13:56 Interview with Dan Johanson from Manjaro ARM
  • 00:25:07 News: New AMD Ryzen Linux Laptops (KDE Slimbook and Tuxedo Pulse 15)
  • 00:32:27 Security Advisory: Browser Extensions
  • 00:37:47 Topic of the Week: Let’s Squash Some Bugs (Bug Reports let’s make them better)
  • 00:55:35 Linux Gaming: SuperTuxKart Beta
  • 00:57:49 Tip of the Week: / and /tmp – Filesystem Breakdown Series Part 1
  • 00:59:47 Software Spotlight: SyncTube
  • 01:01:41 Become a Patron of Destination Linux ( https://destinationlinux.org/contribute )
  • 01:02:40 Get some Swag from the DLN Store ( https://destinationlinux.network/store )
  • 01:02:59 Join the DLN Community (“Dont have a Copy on Write Man”) ( https://destinationlinux.network/contact )
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  • 01:04:06 The Journey Itself . . .
  • 01:04:23 Preview of the Patrons Postshow ( https://destinationlinux.org/contribute )

Comments

  1. Strit says:

    Thanks for having me on this episode. Was great fun. :slight_smile:

    Let me know if you want me to join some other time.

  2. Great interview. The news about Manjaro ARM’s switch to mainline kernel and panfrost mainline GPU driver (on the Pinebook Pro) was great to hear. I say that’s s big milestone. :slightly_smiling_face:

  3. Interesting episode, I enjoyed the conversation about bug reporting.

    One thing I get confused about as a new linux user is actually who to report a bug to.

    For example I think they’re may be a bug on Plank. I use elementary os who have their own pantheon desktop environment. So should I report the bug to the plank developer or elementary os?

    Is there any guidance out there about when you should approach the distro about bugs vs the application developer?

  4. Unfortunately, to get the best response, you should report the bug to the party whose “fault” it is (it’s actually sort of nobody’s fault, when everyone is sincerely trying their best). This implies you delve deep enough into the bug to have a clear sense of which side of a dotted line the “blame” rests with. Is your bug seen in Elementary only, but not in Plank mainline? Then it’s Elementary’s “fault”. Is the problem also seen in Plank, even outside the context of Elementary? Then it’s Plank’s “fault”. Based on this, you can file your bug in the best place.

    If you leave it to the above parties to figure out where the “blame” lies, then that might feel (to them) like work which is too much hassle to do (amidst all their other priorities), so your bug might just sit there, not getting to the right person who might resolve it.

Continue the discussion at discourse.destinationlinux.network

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